Monthly Archives: September 2011

Six Sentence Sunday # 24

Had that really been just a week ago?  A wry smile tugged at her lips. Her new life was  a far cry from the sunny bungalow-on-the-beach with art-trumps-comfort furnishings she’d shared with David. Though centered on a wide tree-lined lane in

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Posted in Six Sentence Sunday, Unique Post

Trivia Thursday # 23

In the 1840s the slave-merchants who had previously sold slaves from the Wekalet el-Gallabeh in Cairo were forced to transfer their trade to a “city of the dead” (cemetary city) outside of Cairo called Kaid Bey because of the government’s belief the slave markets

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Posted in Egypt 1800s, Trivia Thursday

Four Bad Mommies

Today I’m confessing my motherly sins over at http://www.4badmommies.com. Please join me there!

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Posted in 2011, Tambourine Tuesday

Six Sentence Sunday # 23

“Excuse me,” Lou Ann held up a finger to the women. She met the man as he reached the bottom step, arching her back just a little so that her round bottom stuck out and her even rounder chest thrust

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Posted in Cherry's War, Six Sentence Sunday

Trivia Thursday # 22

In the early 1800s in Cairo native Christian and Jewish men were easily distinguishable by the color of their turbans, which were black, blue, or light brown. – source: The Englishwoman in Egypt by Sophia Poole 1846

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Posted in Egypt 1800s, Trivia Thursday

Six Sentence Sunday # 22

From the moment Cherry dried her tears and set her jaw to fight, Ro had begun gleefully rushing her all over Triple Oaks and beyond. “Gatherin’ ammunition” the old woman had called it. They’d visited carpenters, roofers, tilers, and painters,

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Posted in Cherry's War, Six Sentence Sunday

Trivia Thursday # 21

In the early 1800s, in letters home, Sophia Poole describes the street of Cairo as generally narrow (5 to 10 feet wide) and unpaved. Though some streets were as little as 4 feet wide and a few could be forty or

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Posted in Egypt 1800s, Trivia Thursday